Stay at Home Fatigue

If you’re reading this, you’re feeling it, burned out from being at home. Desperately in need of a vacation just for a change of scenery, possibly without those you’ve been living in close quarters with for over a month now. You somehow feel both full of energy and drained at the same time. I can empathize, I feel it too.

So what do we do? In our one click, on demand world, where is our quick and easy solution? Unfortunately, there isn’t one. The good news is that you have all the tools to turn a tough situation into one that is more tolerable. Who knows, maybe you can even be grateful for this time.

First things first though – it is completely okay to feel sad, angry, anxious, stressed, or any number of emotions. It’s important to acknowledge how you feel. If we choose to ignore these emotions, they don’t magically disappear. Once you’ve acknowledged how you’re feeling and why, and you want to shift those emotions, you might explore using the below tools.

Be present. Asking yourself when this will be over or whether or not you’ll have to cancel your trip in the Fall isn’t going to make you feel any better. It’s going to create anxiety and stress. What can you do now, in this moment, that will bring you joy. I know so many people who yearned for more time at home, now that you have it, do something that brings satisfaction to your life.

Reframe. There are many things about this situation that are out of our control. Focus less on what you can’t change and more on what you have control over. Can you use this time to be more creative and think outside the box? I’ve seen several people and businesses doing awesome things despite all the difficulties of dealing with the pandemic. How can you reframe your situation?

Put a positive spin on it. Our brains often choose to focus on negativity. Observe your thoughts, when you find yourself caught up in a negative spiral, can you flip the scenario around to find the positive? Avoid assumptions. We often think we know exactly what’s going on with a person or situation. Stick with the facts, unless you heard or saw it firsthand, it’s likely an assumption. 

Comments are closed.